Here Kitty, Kitty, Kitty

cat-on-ladder“Meow, meow.”

“Did you hear that?”

“Hear what?” John asked.

“Meow.”

“It’s a kitty, but where is it?”

We looked low, and we looked high and spotted a kitty–high in a tree. In fact, higher than the roof line of our house.

“John, get the ladder,” I said.

“She’ll come down on her own. She’s not even our cat.”

“Please get the ladder.” I repeated.

John held the ladder, and I climbed. A couple of feet over the roof line of the house, my natural fear of heights overrode my desire to rescue the kitty. Later that night I was just entering sleepy land when John looked outside.

“The kitty has come down a ways. You could probably reach her now,” he said.

I pulled my heavy, winter coat on over my pajamas—hoping for a softer landing if needed. This time I was about six feet from the kitty before I looked down. Gripping each ladder rung tightly, I backed down. To my surprise the kitty followed me down the ladder.

Little Kitty seems happy here with us. She especially enjoys her regular saucers of milk and climbing trees. John and I are hopeful she will soon learn to climb down trees–without a ladder.

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Here Kitty, Kitty, Kitty

cat-on-ladder“Meow, meow.”

“Did you hear that?”

“Hear what?” John asked.

“Meow.”

“It’s a kitty, but where is it?”

We looked low, and we looked high and spotted a kitty–high in a tree. In fact, higher than the roof line of our house.

“John, get the ladder,” I said.

“She’ll come down on her own. She’s not even our cat.”

“Please get the ladder.” I repeated.

John held the ladder, and I climbed. A couple of feet over the roof line of the house, my natural fear of heights overrode my desire to rescue the kitty. Later that night I was just entering sleepy land when John looked outside.

“The kitty has come down a ways. You could probably reach her now,” he said.

I pulled my heavy, winter coat on over my pajamas—hoping for a softer landing if needed. This time I was about six feet from the kitty before I looked down. Gripping each ladder rung tightly, I backed down. To my surprise the kitty followed me down the ladder.

Little Kitty seems happy here with us. She especially enjoys her regular saucers of milk and climbing trees. John and I are hopeful she will soon learn to climb down trees–without a ladder.

Good Beautiful Morning!

sunrise-1For forty years I have lived on a hill in a house with windows that look to the east. I rocked my babies and looked to the east during the early morning hours. I looked to the east those mornings I searched for gym shorts through laundry dumped on the dining room. Standing at the kitchen sink, I looked to the east and rinsed the breakfast dishes before going to the office.

While looking to the east I saw brilliant scarlet reds, royal purples, and rosy pinks. I saw violets, yellows, and turquoise. Those beautiful sunrises allowed some of my days to begin peacefully and calmly. Not all of them, of course, for getting four kids to school didn’t always allow for such feelings.

My house does have west windows, but somehow life always happened around sunset. Between basketball practices, piano lessons, homework, and fixing dinner, I did not find time to look at many sunsets. So, when weather, children, and time permitted, I stepped outside to better view from my deck God’s early morning paintings through the trees.

I’m glad I’m a morning person.

Me? Cook?

refrigeratorI recently saw an advertisement for a phone app which would allow me to view the chaos inside my refrigerator from the produce, meat, or any other department of my local grocery store. Such an app would enable me to see  someone had placed the nearly empty catsup bottle back in the fridge, and I should purchase catsup. Also, I would know if there were eggs for John’s breakfast or if I should buy a dozen.

Such information might not help me serve better meals, though, for at the top of my “hate to do list” is grocery shopping. A close second is cleaning the refrigerator. Yes, chances are the empty catsup bottle would be hidden behind a milk carton, and I might not focus on the eggs behind the left-over chili.

I do know about  grocery lists. In fact, I always make one. It’s just that I tend to leave it home on the kitchen counter. I suppose I could have a grandchild teach me how to make a list on my phone….

Oh my, look at the time. I’ve got to go. I’m meeting John in town for dinner– I’ll worry about grocery shopping tomorrow.

Morning Chaos

backpack1

“Sure I can get the girls on the school bus,” I told my son and daughter-in-law. “We’ll be fine. You two go ahead and go.”

Several weeks later…

“Nana, if I tip a spoon of cereal until the milk drains off, I can hold it on the rim of the bowl and cannonball it across the table at my sister,” my youngest granddaughter informed me.

“Yes, you can, but don’t. The bus will be here in 17 minutes,” I answered. “Are your backpacks ready to go? Have you brushed your teeth?”

“Nana, do you know our dog won’t eat his food when the weather changes?”

“Are your water bottles ready?” I asked

“Nana, do we have time to make Oreo balls? We could make them into snowmen with chocolate chips for eyes and buttons. I’ll get the chocolate chips ready.”

“Nana, can you put my hair up in a bun?”

“Nana, have you seen my library books?”

“Nana do you have any hair pins?”

“Okay, shoes on, coats on, back packs on…here comes the bus,” I announced.

“Love you, Nana,” they called from the driveway.

“Love you girls, too,” I answered.

COFFEE, COFFEE, WHERE’S MY COFFEE? This lucky Nana needs coffee….